When Our Kids are Sick

sick child

Being a mom is tough. I think many of our blog posts have established that point fairly well. ☺

Being a mom with a sick child can be a little tougher than normal. Even when that kid is a big kid, home from college for a few weeks in the summer.

Case in point, I’ve got a college-aged baby who’s about to have her tonsils removed tomorrow. Yes, it’s a relatively routine outpatient surgery, but it still makes me nervous. I still worry about what could go wrong—all while I’m slapping a peppy smile on my face and spouting every positive mantra I can think of so I don’t make my kid nervous, too.

I’m googling “tonsillectomy” and “post-tonsillectomy recovery tips” in the hopes that I’ll be prepared for whatever comes. Doing my best to make her recovery as painless and comfortable as possible. Although, the doc has already warned us that “this is the most painful procedure you’ll ever have.” Naturally, I wanted to ask how it compared to childbirth, but why scare my child even more? ☺

So, today my question for all you readers out there is: have you or your child had a tonsillectomy? If so, any suggestions on recovery? Any tips for a mom who’s a worrywart?

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Comments (8)

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    prisakiss

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    I appreciate the opportunity to call out to my fellow moms for advice. 🙂 Thanks to those who are able to stop by!!

    Reply

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    Jill

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    Priscilla,
    I don’t have good advice from a “mom perspective” but I can tell you I had a friend who had the procedure at a younger age (maybe ten?) And he came through great and healthier than before. He went from a little boy who was always sick to a strapping athletic type.

    Reply

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    Amy Waite

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    I had mine out when I was 19 or 20. I felt so much better after, as I had been having Strep 4 to 5 times a year. The surgery is not painful, the recovery is painful and she will not want to swallow. Stay hydrated, sip ice water and take your pain meds.They tell you that you can have all the popsicles you want, but you will not be hungry. I did get sick from the liquids I swallowed during surgery. That was not fun, but I have no idea how you prevent that. It is NOT a long recovery. My taste buds were wacked after the surgery, and it took me about a year to enjoy some foods again. I believe that is from the anesthetic and everyone reacts differently. Hope the helps!!

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      prisakiss

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      Jill and Amy, thanks for the insight! My daughter is already putting in requests for gelato and popsicles. I’m drawing the line at a little bell she can ring when she needs something. 🙂

      I’m hoping this will put an end to her strep cases and her sore throats. The doc mentioned making sure she stays hydrated, so we’ll be pushing water and any other cool liquids throughout the day.

      I appreciate your responses and hope you’re having a marvelous day!

      Reply

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    Amanda

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    Please check back in to let us know how she does!

    Reply

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    shanagalen

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    Oh, poor mom and kid. Mine hasn’t had her tonsils out. My nephew did, and he didn’t want to eat for a few days afterward. It’s so hard when they don’t feel well. You want to make it better and can’t. Just be there for her. Let us know how she does.

    Reply

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    Kate Person

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    Okay, I’m going to freak you out, but here’s my experience.
    I was married to my ex-husband when he had his tonsils out ~5 years ago. I think he was around 28yrs old. I’d say his pain tolerance is average.

    I took a couple days off work, he took 2-3 weeks off. He was looped up on pain medicine the first couple days and had a 2nd prescription for I don’t remember what reason. There was also a nasal rinse to keep the scabs clean. I had to nag him hard to do the rinse everyday. I felt really bad, the pain was joke and I don’t think he was playing it up for extra sympathy.

    He said it was the worst thing he’d every been though. He also said if he had known just how painful recovery was going to be he might have 2nd guessed doing it, but after it was all over he was still glad he did it because it fixed his breathing and sleeping problems.

    Reply

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    prisakiss

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    Hi guys, thanks for the advice and heads up. My youngest is taking the pain meds diligently, setting an alarm on her phone for every 6 hours because she knows enough not to overmedicate– thank goodness. 🙂

    She was dealing with nausea this morning, but thankfully the doc prescribed an anti-nausea pill that dissolves on the tongue. Yes, we can attest that the pill does work.

    So far, there’s a been a lot of ice cream and popsicle eating, quite a bit of water drinking and a little bit of mashed potatoes have been consumed. We have some protein shakes that she’s going to try today, mostly because I’m worried about her getting enough nutrients so her body can heal.

    I just touched base with my mom who’s at home with my youngest while I’m at the day job– my baby is resting on the couch with some water, watching “Frozen.” 🙂

    I appreciate the prayers and good thoughts. Hopefully the recovery will continue well. Blessings to you and your family!

    Reply

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